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SlidingKat
04-23-2010, 04:19 PM
I keep noticing a lot of people mentioning adjusting photos. There is actually a very simple method for using Photoshop that gives you the points you need to make adjustments in curves. I got it from an old episode of Photoshop User TV (available as a free download on iTunes). Unfortunately I don't remember which episode. I strongly advise subscribing to the iTunes Photoshop User TV and Matt's Killer Photoshop Tips podcasts on iTunes.

I'm not a teacher, but I will list the steps I do in Photoshop CS3.

1. Open the photo you want to color correct in Photoshop.

2. Select the color sampler tool from the tool bar (this is under the eyedropper tool).

3. Click on the half white half black icon (create adjustment layer) on the bottom right of screen and choose threshold.

4. Click on the threshold graph and drag triangle all the way to the left (photo will go completely white). Then drag it back to the right until you start to see spots of black on your photo (this shows you the darkest points in your photo).

5. Click the OK button on the threshold graph. Then use your cursor to click on one of the black spots. This will leave a circle with a 1 next to it on your photo.

6. Double click on the icon in your adjustment layer (this brings the graph back up). Click on the triangle and drag it all the way to the right (photo will go completely black),. Then slowly drag the triangle back to the left until you see a big enough white spot on your photo that you can click on (this gives you the lightest points in your photo).

7. Click the OK button on the threshold graph to close it. Then use your cursor to click on one of the white spots. This will leave a circle with a 2 next to it on your photo.

8. Delete the threshold layer by dragging it to the trashcan.

9. Add a new layer (by clicking on the square with the corner turned up).

10. Go to Edit, Fill (or hold down the shift key and press the Backspace key). For content choose 50% gray.

11. Change the blend mode of the gray filled layer to Difference.

12. Click on add new adjustment layer (half black half white circle) and choose threshold (your threshold graph should start in the center and go to the left).

13. Click on the triangle and slide it all the way to the left (photo goes completely white). Then slowly come back to the right until you see spots of black. This shows you where the midpoint spots are in your photo (values between darkest and lightest points).

14. Click the OK button on the threshold graph to close it. Then use your cursor to click on one of the black spots. This will leave a circle with a 3 next to it on your photo.

15. Delete the two layers (threshold and the one filled with gray).

16. Click the add adjustment layer (zen circle) and choose Curves. Below the graph are three eyedroppers. Click on the eyedropper furthest to the left (this sets your shadows). Mouse over your photo and click on the circle with the 1 next to it.

17. Go back to your curves graph and click on the eyedropper furthest to the right (this sets your highlights value). Mouse over the photo and click on the circle with the 2 next to it.

18. Go back to your curves graph and click on the eyedropper beneath it that is in the middle (this sets your mid-tones value). Mouse over the photo and click on the circle with the 3 next to it.

19. Click the OK button on the curves graph to close it.

20. To remove the numbered circles click the clear button (under the menu names at the top of the screen).

This gives me perfect color almost every time, because it uses the color values in the photo.

britnkaysmemaw2
04-23-2010, 05:14 PM
Awesome tutorial. I am using a trial of CS2, and you guys are definitely convincing me it is worth upgrading from PSE 7.

Scrappinsass
04-23-2010, 05:44 PM
Andrea's photoshop course covers adjusting photos and it's a real eye opener! I would highly recommend it to anyone using Photoshop.

StacieMac
04-23-2010, 06:46 PM
Thanks for the tip. I will have to do a little experimentation.

donakat
04-23-2010, 11:43 PM
Great job explaining a tough subject, Katie!

southflascrapper
04-24-2010, 06:57 AM
I agree Dona! Curves are difficult to explain to me, but what a job done below! Fantastic tut Katie!

landofoz
04-24-2010, 07:35 AM
Thanks Katie, . Great tut, there is always something new to learn

elenasworld
04-24-2010, 09:07 AM
I have used curves, but for me, it is too time consuming. Like Lightroom, I just never got the hang of it.
I have a great Photoshop book by Scott Kelby who walks you through each and every step, and actually makes things easy to understand.
I even think that Scott Kelby has books for Elements too.
I still prefer to use the adjustment layers/opacity levels for most of the photo treatments I do.
The wonderful thing about photoshop is that there are multiple ways of doing the same thing. The important thing is to keep try methods, tutorials, techniques until you find the ones that work for you.

Darlene Currie
04-24-2010, 12:42 PM
Great tutorial. Photoshop is a huge learning curve. It's never ending and then they come up with a newer version and the learning starts all over again. There's definitely different ways to adjust photos. I've found a few PS actions that help for different effects and it saves a lot of time. I have a few favourites and I found them free just by googling them.

tbcarter2002
04-24-2010, 01:23 PM
Wow, Katie, that is a great tutorial. Thank you for posting. That is the one section of all the classes I took from Andrea that I just couldn't seem to follow. I'm going to try this. Thanks again for taking the time to post it!

SlidingKat
04-24-2010, 01:46 PM
Wow, Katie, that is a great tutorial. Thank you for posting. That is the one section of all the classes I took from Andrea that I just couldn't seem to follow. I'm going to try this. Thanks again for taking the time to post it!

I remembered the questions about curve while taking the class. If you have any trouble let me know and I'll try to walk you through it better.

I use this method so much that it only takes me about 2 minutes to adjust the photo and the results always surprise me! Most of the time I don't realize the photo looks different than what I saw when taking the photo until I use this method and it corrects them.

SlidingKat
04-24-2010, 01:50 PM
I still prefer to use the adjustment layers/opacity levels for most of the photo treatments I do.
.

The difference between this method and using levels is it also sets your mid-tones point.

Usually in levels you move the triangles in to the edges of the graph (telling it where the darkest and brightest points should be). In curves you do that plus define the mid point so the software does the math to correctly position the values on the color spectrum.

elenasworld
04-24-2010, 04:17 PM
The difference between this method and using levels is it also sets your mid-tones point.

Usually in levels you move the triangles in to the edges of the graph (telling it where the darkest and brightest points should be). In curves you do that plus define the mid point so the software does the math to correctly position the values on the color spectrum.

I am sure there are lots of pros and cons to each method.
I have gone through each section of my Scott Kelby books and
while he makes it easy, some are more time consuming than
others. Using the black and white color pickers to adjust midtones
is not my thing. I'd rather spend the bulk of my time on my scrapping,
not adjusting photos. At the end of the day, my dd and the grand
parents dont care if my photos are fantastic, they just like looking
at them, even when they are dark, out of focus, and at all wonky angles.